By now you have begun to explore the interaction between flavours in the food you cook and eat and the wines you enjoy alongside your dishes. You have realized that there are literally millions of possible pairings in the world of food and wine and that thought can be equal parts exhilarating and overwhelming.

Well don’t panic! We have a team of food and wine experts who have put together a library of pairings that you can refer to whenever you need inspiration or confirmation that your planned pairings are on point.

Food and Wine Pairing 101.

In the world of food and wine pairings there are some fundamental pairing rules that have been tried and tested over the years that usually create great results. We say “usually”, because even with established pairings there can be notable exceptions when you add new elements to food such as spices, sauces, or raw ingredients to the mix. Therefore, the basic pairing guide below is to be as a general guide knowing that if you add too much onto the plate that the dish will have different nuances that may sway the profile to require a different wine.

Dry White

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Food
pairings

The world of dry whites is vast and varied; usually they are light, bright, and acidic and pair well with similar foods. Think: spring vegetables, lighter fish, grilled chicken, and citrusy, herb filled dishes.

Food
pairings

The world of dry whites is vast and varied; usually they are light, bright, and acidic and pair well with similar foods. Think: spring vegetables, lighter fish, grilled chicken, and citrusy, herb filled dishes.

Dry White

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Food
pairings

Sweeter whites go fabulously with salty appetizers and big desserts, but also with spicy Asian dishes. Why? The sweet can help lessen the effect of the spices in the dish. Go figure!

Sweet White

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Full bodied
White Wine

Chardonnay

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Food
pairings

Bigger, creamier whites have the body to stand up to bigger, creamier flavors. That is why Chardonnay and salmon are such a classic pairing.

Usually, rich whites are less acidic and play well with a variety of leaner meats such as pork loin or chicken.

Food
pairings

Bigger, creamier whites have the body to stand up to bigger, creamier flavors. That is why Chardonnay and salmon are such a classic pairing.

Usually, rich whites are less acidic and play well with a variety of leaner meats such as pork loin or chicken.

Full bodied
White Wine

Chardonnay

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Food
pairings

Sparkling whites are fun and festive, but they pair well with the most basic snack foods because they marry well with salty dishes.

Sparkling Wine

Champagne

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Light Body Reds

Pinot Noir

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Food
pairings

Lighter reds are more open to interpretation, depending on the dish and the varietal. They tend to interact well with leaner red meats, fattier fish or white meats, and earthier vegetable flavors like mushrooms.

Food
pairings

Lighter reds are more open to interpretation, depending on the dish and the varietal. They tend to interact well with leaner red meats, fattier fish or white meats, and earthier vegetable flavors like mushrooms.

Light Body Reds

Pinot Noir

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Food
pairings

Medium-bodied reds are versatile, though there are many differences from bottle to bottle. They are a flexible choice if your meal takes you from cheese plate through salad and a tomato-based Italian pasta to dessert.

Medium Body Red

Merlot

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Bold Red

Bold Reds

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Food
pairings

Big bold reds are the classic steak wine. Think ribeye or striploin — strong and tannic enough to cut through fat in the meats. Think BBQ chicken or any other seriously spiced entrée.

Food
pairings

Big bold reds are the classic steak wine. Think ribeye or striploin — strong and tannic enough to cut through fat in the meats. Think BBQ chicken or any other seriously spiced entrée.

Bold Red

Bold Reds

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Food
pairings

Dessert wines go with desserts (go figure), which includes sweets, chocolate, cheeses, and salty nuts, the small bites that help you round out a meal.

Dessert Wines

Dessert Wines

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Rosé Wines

Rosé

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Food
pairings

When in doubt, rosé. Rosé wines have the crisp acidity of a white with the fruitiness of a red, which gives them footing with a variety of dishes and cuisines.

Food
pairings

When in doubt, rosé. Rosé wines have the crisp acidity of a white with the fruitiness of a red, which gives them footing with a variety of dishes and cuisines.

Rosé Wines

Rosé

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By now you have begun to explore the interaction between flavours in the food you cook and eat and the wines you enjoy alongside your dishes. You have realized that there are literally millions of possible pairings in the world of food and wine and that thought can be equal parts exhilarating and overwhelming.

Well don’t panic! We have a team of food and wine experts who have put together a library of pairings that you can refer to whenever you need inspiration or confirmation that your planned pairings are on point.

Advanced
food and wine pairing

It is always a good idea to follow some basic rules but the more you explore new dishes, the more opportunity there is to match new wines and the fun comes from experimenting with different combinations of flavours, both in the wine and the food you pair with it! Here are a few more concepts to work with, so you can better plan your pairings:

  • The wine you choose should have more acid than the food you are pairing it with
  • The wine you choose should be sweeter than the food you are pairing it with
  • The wine you choose should have the same flavour intensity as the food you are pairing it with so it can match the boldness or lightness of the food.
  • Red wines pair best with bold flavoured meats such as steaks with rubs or flavoured with herbs
  • White wines pair best with lighter meats. There are many notable exceptions such as Champagne and caviar, or a rich full bodies chardonnay that can cut through fatty charcuterie like prosciutto, or heavy fish sauces.
  • Bitter wines create a nice balance with fat (think heavy tannins)
  • It is easier to match the wine with the sauce than with the meat, as long as the two complement each other.
  • White, Sparkling and Rosé wines usually create contrasting pairings

Congruent Pairings

In a congruent pairing the food and wine chosen will share several compounds or flavors. This can be a sweet wine paired with a sweet dish or a red wine with a buttery finish paired with a buttery pasta dish. The important thing to remember when creating congruent pairings is to ensure that the wine is not overwhelmed by the flavors of the food. Keep it consistent and ensure your wine has enough flavour/tannin/finish/body to match your food.

If the food is overpowering it can make the taste of the wine become bland or unbalanced. The benefits of a congruent pairing are to allow the wine and the food to enhance the flavor of the other. Red wines are often a great go to when looking to create congruent pairings. With aromas and flavors ranging from cherry to smoky, red wines are diverse and often easy to match with food pairings that are similar in profile. Take a glass of a Malbec wine that is a full bodied and it will have a matching profile to many grilled meats, making it a great congruent pairing

Complementary Pairings

On the other hand complementary pairings are based on food and wine combinations that share no compounds or flavors, but instead complement each other. The flavors in each are balanced by their contrasting elements.

Rosé, White, and Sparkling wine usually provide decent choice for contrasting pairings. A sweet white wine like a gewurztraminer paired with an Indian curry, for example, will allow the sugar in the wine to temper and balance out the spiciness in the dish.

Another common complementary pairing is white wine with salty dishes. The saltiness from the food will immediately decrease the sweetness of the wine and bring out the wines fruity notes and aromas. A glass of Chardonnay or Pinot Grigio will pair perfectly with salty popcorn and specially well with fried dishes like Spanish tapas dishes such as “calamares” (squid), or “patatas bravas” (pan friend or oven roasted potatoes in a rich tomato sauce).

Complementary Pairings

On the other hand complementary pairings are based on food and wine combinations that share no compounds or flavors, but instead complement each other. The flavors in each are balanced by their contrasting elements.

Rosé, White, and Sparkling wine usually provide decent choice for contrasting pairings. A sweet white wine like a gewurztraminer paired with an Indian curry, for example, will allow the sugar in the wine to temper and balance out the spiciness in the dish.
Another common complementary pairing is white wine with salty dishes. The saltiness from the food will immediately decrease the sweetness of the wine and bring out the wines fruity notes and aromas. A glass of Chardonnay or Pinot Grigio will pair perfectly with salty popcorn and specially well with fried dishes like Spanish tapas dishes such as “calamares” (squid), or “patatas bravas” (pan friend or oven roasted potatoes in a rich tomato sauce).

Wine and Cheese Pairing Basics

The good news when it comes to pairing wines and cheese, is that there are so many great pairings opportunities, it’s a much easier task than food and wine. That said we have put together a list of basic pairing rules that you can apply to help you avoid some common mistakes, and to ensure you have a winning formula when creating your pairings.

When choosing cheeses for a pairing you should choose wines that are equal in intensity to match the flavours. For example, a stinky blue cheese is going to need something bold and powerful. A good rule of thumb is picking wines that have an alcohol level of 14.5% or over to match with big, flavoured cheeses, and around 12% for more delicate cheeses.

Source: https://blog.borderio.com/maridaje-de-quesos-y-vinos-tips/

Source: https://www.eldiario.es/consumoclaro/comer/necesitas-parmigiano-reggiano-no-den-queso_1_7875693.html

Hard and aged cheeses such as gran Padano or parmigiana Reggiano require bold reds. The reason for this is that as cheese ages, it gradually loses moisture over time. This causes salt crystals to form on the cheese (in many cases), and certainly brings an intensity in profile as the cheese matures. We suggest choosing cheeses that have at least several months, or a year or more of aging. Try a few different aged cheddars (1-year, 2-year, 5-year) and see the difference as they age. Try these out with slightly different fruit levels, and different alcohol levels like an Amarone, or a California Cabernet Sauvignon.

Hard and aged cheeses such as gran Padano or parmigiana Reggiano require bold reds. The reason for this is that as cheese ages, it gradually loses moisture over time. This causes salt crystals to form on the cheese (in many cases), and certainly brings an intensity in profile as the cheese matures. We suggest choosing cheeses that have at least several months, or a year or more of aging. Try a few different aged cheddars (1-year, 2-year, 5-year) and see the difference as they age. Try these out with slightly different fruit levels, and different alcohol levels like an Amarone, or a California Cabernet Sauvignon.

Source: https://www.eldiario.es/
consumoclaro/comer/necesitas-parmigiano-reggiano-no-den-queso_1_7875693.html

To appreciate wines to their fullest its ideal to ensure you serve them at the correct temperature. Dry red wines are at their best between 14 and 20ºC, whereas light red, dry white and rosé wines at a temperature between 10 and 12ºC. For dessert wines, they are ideal at 8ºC, and sparkling wines or Champagne ideally should be served at 5 or 6ºC.

STORING WINE

Source: https://www.devinosyvides.com.ar/nota/739-como-hacer-para-servir-un-vino-a-la-temperatura-correcta

Source:https://www.wine-tastings-guide.com/port-and-stilton.html

Cheeses that have a powerful aroma, like a Roquefort, should be paired with sweeter wines like a Sauternes that will balance out that strong funky taste, with a residual palate cleanse and finish neutral. The idea is the sweetness brings out the creamy tones in the cheese. Another great example is Port and Stilton cheese.

Cheeses that have a powerful aroma, like a Roquefort, should be paired with sweeter wines like a Sauternes that will balance out that strong funky taste, with a residual palate cleanse and finish neutral. The idea is the sweetness brings out the creamy tones in the cheese. Another great example is Port and Stilton cheese.

Source:https://www.wine-tastings-guide.com/port-and-stilton.html

Try cheeses and wines that are made in the same region. Some examples would be Champagne and Brie, or Epoisses de Bourgogne with a crisp chardonnay. BC Sauvignon blanc and Okanagan goat cheese is another great pairing we love. If you like Spanish wine and cheese then Manchego and Garnacha (grenache in France and elsewhere outside Spain) are a terrific and satisfying pair.

Source: https://blog.borderio.com/maridaje-de-quesos-y-vinos-tips/